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Category: Slices of Life

A smile of lorikeets

Every morning I wake to the sound of  birds in the big gum trees outside my window. Mostly they’re rainbow lorikeets, but sometimes there’s also a few magpies carolling joyfully away, or the mournful sound of currawongs who sing in the minor key,  occasionally a crow, cawing grimly, and pigeons and doves coo-cooing quietly.  The photo below is from Sue from My Wild Australia

But the rainbow lorikeets are both the noisiest and the happiest morning sound, to me (though a joyfully warbling magpie is a wonder and a delight.) You can see why they’re called rainbow lorikeets, can’t you? That rainbow of colours is gorgeous. But they’re also happy, cheerful birds and I love them.

Here’s a video that Sue from My Wild Australia recorded of a couple of lorikeets hanging from a branch, playing, flirting and squabbling. And when they’re upside down with their wings spread out, you can see more colours. Here’s another little video of them bathing in a pot plant saucer on a hot day, and having such fun.  And if you watch this video, you’ll hear the sound I wake up to most morning. Who needs an alarm clock? 

Easter memories

It’s Easter, one of my favorite holidays. It comes in the autumn here, and the days are usually warm and golden and there’s a harvest festival mood, picking apples and nuts and just enjoying the season — and eating Easter eggs and hot cross buns, of course.

Easter in my family was a time we spent with friends, and my godmother, who was a single lady. There wasn’t that frenetic Christmas attempt to cover all bases and visit all relatives. 

It’s a glorious time of year in Victoria (my state) and especially in the north-east of the state, where I lived as a child. We lived in the foothills of the mountains, and splashes of exotic autumn color stood out against the subtler shades of the native bush.

If the weather turned wet and cool, we’d wait a few days, then go out and pick wild field mushrooms. As a child I loved picking mushrooms, but wouldn’t eat them. These days they’re a favorite for breakfast or supper. Mostly I cook them with a little butter or olive oil, some chopped up bacon, garlic, a little chopped onion and a sprinkling of fresh thyme. Maybe a splash of dry sherry. And served on piping hot toast. Yum yum.

But the main memories I have of Easter are the barbecues we’d have in the bush. We’d head out in the car, and find a space near a creek — this was usually in the foothills of the Great Dividing Range, and the water in those creeks was clean and sweet. (Photo credit here.)

We kids (there were four of us) would be sent out to gather firewood, while Dad made a rough fireplace using river stones. Mum and my godmother would butter bread and slice up tomatoes and onions. We’d light a fire, and while it burned down a bit we kids would splash around in the creek, and explore our surroundings.

When the fire was ready—actually usually before, because Dad did love a fire — Dad would produce a metal grill from the boot of the car and on would go sausages and lamb chops and sliced onions — the standard barbecue fare in Australia in those days.  (Photo credit here)

The meat was always a little bit charred because of Dad’s impatience, and I have to say, I still love my sausages charred. Mum on the other hand preferred her lamb rare, but barbecuing was a man’s job back then, so she had to put up with extremely well done. 

We kids ate our chops and sausages on slices of bread — no plates for us, and as that reduced the washing up (which was the kids’ job) we liked it that way. I still prefer a sausage in a slice of bread. We’d finish the meal with apples and big slices of juicy watermelon.  And maybe we’d crack walnuts and later float the little shells down the creek in boat races.

The adults would finish their meal with cheese and crackers. Mum usually brought a thermos of tea, but sometimes we’d boil the billy over the fire and make tea the bushman’s way. We kids mostly just drank the fresh, clear creek water, sometimes with home-made cordial that my godmother brought.

Those childhood barbecues were a far cry from the ones most people have today, with big gas grills and loads of equipment and as much preparation and cleaning up as any big dinner party. And these days I’m wary of drinking water straight from a creek — sadly, safe drinking water comes in bottles now.  I still love a barbecue, but every Easter as I plan my days, I remember those simpler days . . .

Whether you’re in spring or autumn, or in a place where you don’t have such distinct seasons, and whether you celebrate Easter as a holiday or not, I hope you’re having a nice relaxing time, and are able to get out into the natural world and remember and enjoy some of the simpler things in life.  (Photo credit here

A Writers' Retreat

Every year, in March, I go away on a writers retreat with a group of eight or nine other writers. We’ve been doing it for years — thirteen, to be exact. Not everyone can come every year, but most years we manage seven or eight of us.

It began as a way of breaking down isolation — most of us only ever see each other once a year at the annual Romance Writers of Australia conference, and that’s always so busy, it’s hard to find time to really talk. When we started, not all of us knew everyone, but of course, now we’re all firm friends.

The very first retreat was in Queenscliff, overlooking the beach, but when that place became unavailable, the second year we went inland. It was a beautiful area, but we decided we needed to be near the beach. And for the last eight years we’ve settled on this place — in south-east Queensland.  

As we’re all professional writers (ie earning our living by writing) and all have impending deadlines,  we can’t afford to simply let  a week by the sea be a social occasion, so we spend the mornings (and some of the rest of the day) writing. And staring out to sea . . .  This was the view from my room this year.

The sea and sky offers an endlessly changing vista and as well as gazing, I took more than a few photos. I have quite a few of this sunset, for instance, which came after a blustery, blowy day.

We also do some professional development, and plan and schedule lunch-time and evening sessions. Those sessions are not simply a way of keeping up with the latest developments in publishing, they’re also a way of refreshing the muse, and trying new things. I posted a list of this year’s sessions here, on the Word Wench blog, where I blog every fortnight.

I should also confess that there’s also a wee bit of shopping done. I’m not much of a shopper in general, but my friends are, and once enticed into a local shoe shop with a sale that most of them had taken advantage of, I came away with these very comfy new boots. I have a fondness for red shoes — I suspect it’s a lifelong rebellion against the message of the story The Red Shoes, where a little girl was horribly punished for the sin of wanting pretty shoes. Bah humbug to that, I say, as I don my red shoes!

In March, Queensland is still very  warm and summery. But when I return to Melbourne, autumn has very definitely arrived, as my Virginia creeper gloriously demonstrates. Every year this plant swathes my garden in gorgeousness and gives me such pleasure as I watch the changing colours.